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I'm going to be doing a list of Kemetic gods that are worshiped in the Kemetic Orthodox faith. I'll start with A-F today and then post more tomorrow. This list is at the request of one of my members.

Egyptian Gods and Goddess

(A)

Aker - "Bender" A predynastic earth-Netjer symbolized in the two horizons of setting and rising sun; sometimes called "Yesterday and Today" as His symbol is a two-headed lion (two heads at either end of one body). Aker is the protector of Ra in His overnight travels, and represents the edges of reality and the separation between the reckoning of past and future.

Amen (Amun, Amon, Yimen; GR Zeus-Ammon, Jupiter-Ammon) - "The Hidden One," Amen is "King of the Netjeru," a major Name of Netjer in Uaset (Thebes) in Upper Kemet. The "Lord to the Limit" who created all things (see Nun, Tem, Ra and Ptah entries for other Creator Names), Amen the lord of the hidden wind eventually syncretised with the royal cult of Ra to emerge as Amen-Ra in the Middle Kingdom. Successions of Theban rulers would propel Amen's fame to national and eventually international status; even Alexander the Great sought Amen's blessing before declaring himself Kemet's ruler. It is possible that the conception of Amen influenced conceptions of the Judaic/Hebraic God (YHVH) as well as those of Greek Zeus and Roman Jupiter; the Romans declared Jupiter and Amen to be the same divinity. Amen is generally depicted as a man wearing a tall golden plumed crown and a red and white pleated skirt; infrequently He is also shown as a
ram with curled-down horns (not to be confused with the ram representing Khnum), or a ram-headed man.

Amenet (Amaunet) - "The Hidden Female" Consort to Amen of Khemenu (GR Hermopolis), Amenet represents the hidden feminine side of Netjer; "Great Queen" to Amen's "King of Netjeru." [A less-mentioned feminine form of Ra, as "Rait," is also mentioned in connection with Amenet.] Amenet was syncretised in later parts of Kemetic history with Mut and Nit.   Depiction (if She is depicted at all) is of a woman wearing the Double Crown.

Am-mit (Am-mut) - "Dead-Swallower" Stationed just to the side of the scales in the Hall of Double Truth [see Ma'at], Am-mit's function is to await the postmortem judgment of a soul (envisioned as the deceased's heart being weighed on a scale against the feather of Ma'at) and then, if the soul fails the test, Am-mit snatches up the heart and devours it, causing the soul to cease to exist. As the
ultimate punishment of the wicked, Am-mit is depicted as a hideous composite of the animals ancient Kemetics feared most: crocodile snout and head, feline claws and front, and a hippopotamus body and back legs. Am-mit is also sometimes referred to as "Great of Death," and papyri depict Her patiently watching Yinepu weighing a man's heart against the feather of Ma'at.

Amset known as Imset (will cover that one when I get to Imset)

Anpu as known as Yinepu (will cover that one when I get to Yinepu)

Anubis as known as Yinepu

An(u)ket (GR Anukis) - "Embracing Lady," consort (or alternately, daughter) to Khnum, Anuket is depicted as a woman wearing an unusual tall crown of ostrich feathers, probably a Nubian headdress. She is, along with Khnum and Satet, one of the three Names worshipped at Abu (Elephantine) in Upper Kemet, and can be seen on the walls of the temple of Ramses II at modern-day Abu Simbel, as well as in other Nubian temples. As a Name of Netjer associated with Elephantine and Sehel Island, in the area considered by Kemetics to be the source of the Nile, Anuket is a protectress of the mighty river (see Hapi). In earliest times She is also called a daughter of Ra.

Apep (GR Apophis) - (actual translation unclear; the Romans believed it to mean "He Who Is Spat Out") While outside of the creation of Tem and thus technically not a part of Netjer, Apep is yet a part of the universe; that part which constantly seeks its dissolution and destruction. Apep is characterized as an "evil serpent"in some texts, but it must be remembered that for Kemetics this is not a personalized evil, such as the Christian or Islamic concepts of "devil." Apep's birthday and New Year's day are marked by the performance of execration rituals to stave off "random acts of Apep" during the subsequent year. It is stated in more than one text that "Apep" is not Its actual Name, but while many other names are given for Apep, none is acknowledged to be the "true" one, possibly to avoid attracting the attention of this extremely powerful Presence.

Apis as known as Wesir-Hapi (Will cover that one when I get to Wesir-Hapi)

Apophis as known as Apep.

Apuat, also known as Wepwawet (will cover that one when I get to it)

Aset (Auset, Ese; GR Isis) - "The Throne," Aset is the power that makes kings; a feminine Name appearing in texts beginning in Dynasty IV as wife and sister to Wesir and daughter of Nut and Geb. In earliest times Aset is depicted as the "mistress of magic" (see Heka) Who learns Ra's true name and thus the secrets of the universe. In the cult of Wesir Aset is attributed with having prepared Him for burial and conceiving a son upon His dead body, which She magically reanimates long enough to complete (in Kemetic texts, Wesir's death is attributed to drowning; the dismemberment myth given by Plutarch does not appear until millennia later and may not even be Kemetic in origin. See Wesir.). In later periods and particularly after the New Kingdom, Aset was syncretized with a number of other Names, Hethert in particular, and took on "mother goddess" characteristics. During this period, Aset's importance as mother of Heru-sa-Aset ("Horus, son of Isis", a Name intimately connected with kingship and therefore within Aset's purview as kingmaker) became paramount, in ways strongly suggestive of the Christian cult of the Virgin Mary. The Romans declared all feminine Names to be forms of Aset, crowning Her "Goddess of Ten Thousand Names," though Kemetic mythology does not exhibit this specific archetype.

Aten (Aton, Yiten) - "Sun's Disk" Aten is the physically visible sun, the yellow sphere in earth's sky that can fructify or scorch. The Aten-disk is venerated as a form of Shu, Ra, or Heru from the late Middle Kingdom onward and was not, as some have erroneously stated, "invented" by New Kingdom pharaoh Amenhotep IV/Akhenaten. However, beginning with Akhenaten's father, Amenhotep III, Aten enjoyed a higher level of worship, and during Akhenaten's reign, for reasons not entirely clear in the historic record, Akhenaten declared all other Names invalid and Their priests useless, and ordered Kemet to worship him as the "Sole One of Aten," who would then take the people's prayers to His Father (he did not order them to worship Aten; the texts state that only Akhenaten is qualified to do this as the Disk's intermediary). Akhenaten's religious reforms, which did not represent monotheism as has been often suggested (Akhenaten offers Ma'at in friezes, and some of his hymns refer to "Ra-Heru-akhety in His Name of Shu Who is in Aten," indicating Akhenaten's "destruction" of other Names was selective), did not long outlast him; a backlash against the Atenist movement by the priesthood of Amen-Ra after Akhenaten's death resulted in the loss of much of this Name's information.

Atum, also known as Tem (will cover that one when I get to him).

Ausar, also known as Wesir (will cover that one when I get to it).

(B)

Bast (Ubasti; G/R Bastet, Bubastis) - "Devouring Lady" (from bas, to devour, with feminine ending); One of the earliest-documented Names with an appearance in Dynasty II, Bast is first and foremost a
protectress; specifically of the royal house and the Two Lands. During Dynasty IV, She was a patron-Name of Lower Kemet, paired with Hethert as a patron-Name of Upper Kemet, as Wadjet and Nekhbet are often depicted in later times; the Valley Temple of the Pyramid of Khafra at modern-day Giza next to the Sphinx had a "Portal of Bast" as well as statues of Bast in the company of the king. Over time, Bast's image metamorphosed to become more similar to that of Hethert; eventually, into the Greek period, She would be equated with the virgin huntress Artemis and considered the protectress of children and pregnant mothers, musicians and a goddess of all sorts of excess, especially sexual excess. However, Bast's original visage did not include the "cat as sex symbol" archetype. (Incidentally, it is also from the Greeks that the erroneous belief in Bast as a daughter of Aset and Wesir derives; Bast as Artemis had to have a twin brother, Apollo (equated with Heru-sa-Aset by the Greeks).) A play on words in Bast's name resulted in Her being equated in Greco-Roman times with the "soul of Isis" (ba-Aset), probably in keeping with Aset's gradual syncretism into the Roman Isis of Ten Thousand Names.

Bat - "She Who hoes"; a Predynastic Name of Netjer associated with cows, the sky and fertility; later assimilated into Hethert. Bat's front-facing, cow-eared visage would become synonymous with the ritual rattle used in invocation and purification rituals known as the sistrum.

Bes - (Meaning unknown, but may be derivative from the same root as the Netjer-name of Bast) A Name of Netjer with unknown but probably Sub-Saharan origin, Bes is unusually depicted as a man of dwarf stature, facing forward (as opposed to the nearly universal canonical profile), wearing the mask and tail of a lion and carrying a large knife. Bes is the Name associated most strongly with protection of the household and specifically its children and pregnant women; he was also seen  depiction as a Pygmy-like being, as Pygmies were known to serve a court-jester function in the Old Kingdom) as the patron of laughter, dancing, happiness and fertility. Bes's masked face with lolling tongue can be seen on amulets and pieces of furniture throughout Kemetic history as well as funerary stelae of the Late Period.

Buto, also known as Wadjet (I'll get to that one when we cover that).

There are no C's in the Kemetic Pantheon.

(D)

Djehuty (Tehuti; G/R Thoth) - "Leader (derivative form)" Ibis-headed Lord of Time, Writing and Wisdom, Djehuty is said to have invented the hieroglyphic script and negotiated five extra days from the moon in order to perfect the 365-day year. As a result of these mythological connections, Djehuty is the patron of writers, teachers, accountants and all persons involved in the dissemination of knowledge, writing and/or calculation. His consorts are alternately Ma'at, Netjeret of Truth and Order; or Seshat, patroness of recordkeeping, libraries and the foundation of buildings. Djehuty is the nominal head of the Ogdoad (group of eight Names of Netjer) honored at the city of Khemenu (Hermopolis of the Greeks), overseeing four pairs of natural syzygies: Eternity (Heh/Hehet), Darkness (Kek/Keket), Water/Potentiality (Nun/Nunet) and Wind/Hiddenness (Amen/Amenet). Along with the ibis, Djehuty is associated with baboons of the genus Cynocephalis, which the ancients observed raising their hands and "singing" to the rising sun; He stands at the side of the scales in the Hall of Two Truths to record the verdict which Yinepu delivers after weighing the deceased's heart against the feather of Ma'at.

Duamutef (Tuamutef) - "Praising his mother" One of the "Four Sons of Heru" depicted in funerary literature as protecting the throne of Wesir in the Underworld, Duamutef is depicted as a jackal-headed mummified human on funerary furniture and especially the "canopic" jars which held the organs of the deceased (Duamutef's jar held the stomach). Later Hermetic philosophers would equate Duamutef with the element of earth because of his association with the funerary protectress Nit and the direction of north.

(E)

Edjo, also known as Wadjet (I'll cover that when we get there).

Ennead, also known as Pesedjet (I"ll cover that when we get there).

(F)

Four Sons of Heru (Horus) - See Duamutef, Hapy, Imset, Qebshenef


Note: I'll post more tomorrow.


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(G)

Geb(WB Seb, Keb, Qeb) - "Earth (also "goose")" Geb is the "Father Earth" (unlike many ancient religions which understood the physical planet Earth as feminine) of the Kemetics; mountains are said to be His bones, and He lies forever inert below his sister-wife, Nut, the starry vault of the sky. Geb and Nut's five children would make up the personalized part of the Pesedjet (Great Nine Names) of the city of An (Heliopolis): Wesir, Her-wer, Set, Aset and Nebt-het. As the father of Wesir, Geb is often invoked as the "first ruler" of Kemet and some ancient king-lists actually list Him and His immediate descendants (Wesir and Heru-sa-Aset) as if they had ruled as physical kings. Geb's theophany is the goose (whose name in Kemetic is also "Geb"), which according to one mythological cycle was the form the Creator took on the day of creation (the "First Time"), cackling His delight into existence in the myriad creatures who walk upon Geb's body.

(H)

Haidith, as known as Heru behdety (I'll get to that one when we come across it.

Hap(i)/Hapy - "Runner" Hapi is the body of the River Nile itself, the world's longest waterway, without which the Two Lands would cease to exist. Hapi is venerated both as the physical sacred waters of the river and symbologically as the concept of life and fertility, reenacted every day in the land along the "Old Man River's" body. Kemetics saw in their precarious existence between mountains and deserts a miracle of life, bestowed upon them by the blessings of Hapi, Who inundated them each winter and provided the Black Land of Wesir which secured the harvest. Hapi could be capricious, however; no flood or too much flood meant disaster, either from famine or from inability to run from His rushing force. Since the erection of the High Dam at Aswan in the latter part of this century, Hapi's influence is not felt in Egypt as strongly as it was in antiquity - but the Nile still remains the central feature of Egyptian culture and spirituality - Copts, Nubians and Muslims still celebrate holy days with river cruises, boat processions and water blessings.

Hapy - "Runner" One of the "Four Sons of Heru" depicted in funerary literature as protecting the throne of Wesir in the Underworld, Hapy is depicted as a baboon-headed mummified human on funerary furniture and especially the "canopic" jars which held the organs of the deceased (Hapy's jar held the lungs). Later Hermetic philosophers would equate Hapy with the element of air because of his association with the funerary protectress Nebt-het and the direction of east.

Heru-nedj-it-ef (G/R Harendotes) - "Heru, Savior of His Father" - a form of Heru associated with Heru-sa-Aset, particularly in His role as vindicator of Wesir by avenging His death.

Heru-em-Akhet (G/R Harmachis) - "Heru-in-the-Horizon" Heru-em-Akhet is not truly a Name of Netjer, but a divinized persona specifically applied to the great Sphinx stationed before the second pyramid (Khafre) at modern-day Giza. As protector of the Old Kingdom necropolis, Heru-em-Akhet sits facing the dawn and the Nile, watching that no one disturbs the rest of his masters, with his human head and lion body on a much grander scale than any other sphinx known to Kemet. The name also alludes to the presence of the king (Heru) inside the pyramid (more often than not called a horizon, symbolizing the death implicit in sunset and the rebirth implicit in sunrise).

Her-wer (Har-wer; G/R Haroeris) - "Great Heru/Heru the Elder" Heru in His most abstract, "original" form is known as a hawk, primarily a divinity of sky, even on Predynastic pottery and other objects. The hawk of Her-wer came to be associated with the kingship and was depicted seated atop the ruler's name in the original "serekh" (palace facade) style of hieroglyphic rendering. Her-wer is viewed as a brother, rather than son, of Wesir; His main opposite being Set, the Lord of the Red Land, and the storms in Her-wer's placid blue sky. Confusion of Her-wer's attributes with Heru-sa-Aset's led in later times to both Netjeru being intertwined; however, in His earliest depictions, Her-wer is strictly a celestial and sometimes solar divinity; only later is He associated with the kings and with the myth cycle of the Wesirian cult.

Heru-pa-khered (G/R Harpocrates) - "Heru the Child" A specific form of Heru-sa-Aset as a youngster, written about profusely during the Greco-Roman periods, Heru-pa-Khered is depicted as a child holding one finger to his mouth (a direct copy of the hieroglyph for "child," not related to the modern meaning of "silence" we see in that gesture). Stele depicting Heru-pa-Khered standing on the back of a crocodile, holding snakes in His outstretched hands were erected in temple courtyards, where they would be immersed or lustrated in water; the water was then used for blessing and healing purposes as the Name was attributed with many protective and healing powers. It is perhaps ironic in this light that late myths describe Heru-pa-Khered as being both physically weak and incapable of protecting himself, relying upon the power of His mother Aset to protect Him until His manhood.

Heru-sa-Aset (G/R Harseisis) - "Heru, son of Aset" Probably the best-known and most widely worshipped of the Names of Heru, Heru-sa-Aset, the miraculous child of Aset and Wesir, is symbolized directly in the ruler of Kemet - as the caretaker of the legacy of his predecessor (called "Wesir" upon death in honor of the Lord of the Deceased), and as the defender of the weak and the innocent against outside forces (symbolized in Set, Lord of foreign lands, strength and violence). During some periods the rulers were believed to be incarnations or avatars of Heru-sa-Aset, and their wives incarnations of Hethert (Heru's consort at Idfu/Edfu and Ta-Netjer/Dendera), or Aset. Even female rulers of Kemet, such as Hatshepsut and Twosret of the New Kingdom, were referred to as "the (Living) Heru." Heru-sa-Aset is usually depicted as a hawk-headed man wearing the Double Crown and a breastplate over His kilt. Heru-sa-Aset's rise to kingship, embodied in a series of popular tales which are referred to in English as "the Contendings of Heru and Set," probably echoes the process of Kemet's unification undertaken by the early Upper Kemetic Predynastic chiefs, who considered themselves "Shemsu Heru" or "Followers of Horus."

Hethert (Het-heret, Het-Heru; G/R Hathor) - "House of Heru" Another Name known from predynastic times, Hethert represents the feminine principle, as reflected in several of Her symbols: the cow, the mirror, and the ritual rattle or sistrum. Hethert is patroness of women, and professions given to Her priesthood include dancers, singers, actors and acrobats; even up to Greek times the arts were under Hethert's dominion. Hethert's temples, especially that at Ta-Netjer (Arabic Dendera) were centers for both healing (with a hospital/sanatorium on-site) and midwifery. Priests in the temple of Ta-Netjer conducted oracles with Hethert in trance rituals held in crypts underneath the sanctuary, and any person could sleep on the temple roof and hope for a dream, which could be interpreted the next morning by the priests. Even today, one can see graffiti and gameboards left behind by those pilgrims, carved into the stones of Ta-Netjer's roof. Hethert's association with both cows and the sistrum probably results from Her assimilation of the Predynastic Netjer Bat; "sistrum capitals" atop the pillars throughout Kemetic temples show Hethert's full face with cow's ears atop a "naos"-style sistrum. Hethert was closely associated with Heru-Behdety at Edfu, perhaps influencing the fact that She was a patroness of Kemet's queens (as Heru is to the king, so Hethert is to the queen). Some queens are referred to by Hethert's titles of "Mistress of Heaven" and "Lady of Gold." Nefertary's spectacular temple at Abu Simbel in Nubia depicts the Great Royal Wife as Hethert in many places; and her husband Ramses II is depicted in its sanctuary, suckling from the udder of Hethert as a divine cow.

Heka (G/R Hike) - "Magical Speech" Heka is an abstract Name, embodying the concept that there is power in the spoken word - power which can be used for good or ill. While sometimes Heka is simply translated into English as "magic," Heka is more than a "magic word" or a "spell" - He is a lasting reminder of the responsibility to keep one's speech in accordance with Ma'at. Anyone who has spoken an unkind word can attest to the power speech has to change our lives; and Heka as embodied in the Ren, or name, is a personal force in Kemetic culture - to speak of a thing is to cause it to exist. Kemet's entire funerary industry may derive directly from this concept of "meaningful speech," as to continue to repeat a person's name was to render them immortal - so long as your name was known, you could not die. When depicted, Heka is shown standing in the prow of Ra's Boat of Millions of Years along with Hu (Authoritative Utterance/Command) and Sia (Perception).
(H) Continue.

Heqet (Hekat) - (meaning unknown; perhaps derived from the words for "ruler" and "sceptre" given Her purview over royal and divine births) Depicted as a woman with the head of a frog (viewed by the Kemetic people to be a particularly fertile animal), Heqet is the midwife of Netjer, presiding over all births and particularly those of royal parentage, as witnessed in paintings in tombs and temples. In the company of Aset, Meshkhenet and Khnum, Heqet was attributed with the deliverance of the three initial kings of Dynasty V in a folktale (preserved in Papyrus Westcar) which comes down to us by the popular name of "Khufu and the Magicians." As midwife, Heqet is sometimes paired with Khnum, who creates the form of the infant and its ka upon His potter's wheel. Heqet is also sometimes considered the wife of Her-wer, and at least in the Old Kingdom, Her priestesses served as trained midwives.

Heru (Har, Hor; G/R Horus) - "High, Above" A collective term for a number of Names depicted either as hawk-headed men or as full hawks, Heru symbolizes leadership of all sorts and specifically the leadership demonstrated in the position of Ruler of the Two Lands. Heru is known even before the advent of hieroglyphic writing from depictions on Predynastic pottery and walls, of hawks and standards with the hawk sitting atop them; Predynastic and early Dynastic kings wrote their names within a serekh, a drawing of a palace with a hawk sitting upon its roof. The Kemetic observed in the hawk theophany the quickness, intelligence, alertness and staying power of a just ruler; nothing escaped the watchful eye of the true Heru, and no wrongdoer escaped His claws. Earlier forms of Heru depict Him as an abstract sky-god, with the sun and moon His two eyes; later ones depict Him as anything from victory personified to the son of the Lord of the Dead, Heru-sa-Aset, who would become the most popular form of Heru in the later periods.

Heru-akhety, as known as Ra-Heru-akhety

Heru-behdety (G/R Haidith) - "Heru of the city of Behdet" The Winged Disk so popular in Kemetic architecture which found its way into other forms of classical art is Heru-behdety, victory personified. In the myth which has come to define this Name, Ra sends Behdety out against Set and his minions to protect the kingship; the battle is joined and is well-fought on both sides with no victors, as the two Netjeru are evenly matched. Ra, watching from heaven, wishes to tilt the battle in Behdety's balance and so transforms Him into a winged sun-disk. Behdety then flies into the sky, blinding his foes and winning the day. The myth is probably a symbolic retelling of the conquest of the lands of the Delta (Lower Kemet, attributed to Set) by the Predynastic chiefs of Upper Kemet (attributed to Her-wer). Behdety represents the brilliant force of the just warrior, the triumph of daytime over nighttime, the black land over the red, the forces of order over dissension.

Heru-em-Akhet (G/R Harmachis) - "Heru-in-the-Horizon" Heru-em-Akhet is not truly a Name of Netjer, but a divinized persona specifically applied to the great Sphinx stationed before the second pyramid (Khafre) at modern-day Giza. As protector of the Old Kingdom necropolis, Heru-em-Akhet sits facing the dawn and the Nile, watching that no one disturbs the rest of his masters, with his human head and lion body on a much grander scale than any other sphinx known to Kemet. The name also alludes to the presence of the king (Heru) inside the pyramid (more often than not called a horizon, symbolizing the death implicit in sunset and the rebirth implicit in sunrise).

Heru-nedj-it-ef (G/R Harendotes) - "Heru, Savior of His Father" - a form of Heru associated with Heru-sa-Aset, particularly in His role as vindicator of Wesir by avenging His death.

Heru-pa-khered (G/R Harpocrates) - "Heru the Child" A specific form of Heru-sa-Aset as a youngster, written about profusely during the Greco-Roman periods, Heru-pa-Khered is depicted as a child holding one finger to his mouth (a direct copy of the hieroglyph for "child," not related to the modern meaning of "silence" we see in that gesture). Stele depicting Heru-pa-Khered standing on the back of a crocodile, holding snakes in His outstretched hands were erected in temple courtyards, where they would be immersed or lustrated in water; the water was then used for blessing and healing purposes as the Name was attributed with many protective and healing powers. It is perhaps ironic in this light that late myths describe Heru-pa-Khered as being both physically weak and incapable of protecting himself, relying upon the power of His mother Aset to protect Him until His manhood.

Heru-sa-Aset (G/R Harseisis) - "Heru, son of Aset" Probably the best-known and most widely worshipped of the Names of Heru, Heru-sa-Aset, the miraculous child of Aset and Wesir, is symbolized directly in the ruler of Kemet - as the caretaker of the legacy of his predecessor (called "Wesir" upon death in honor of the Lord of the Deceased), and as the defender of the weak and the innocent against outside forces (symbolized in Set, Lord of foreign lands, strength and violence). During some periods the rulers were believed to be incarnations or avatars of Heru-sa-Aset, and their wives incarnations of Hethert (Heru's consort at Idfu/Edfu and Ta-Netjer/Dendera), or Aset. Even female rulers of Kemet, such as Hatshepsut and Twosret of the New Kingdom, were referred to as "the (Living) Heru." Heru-sa-Aset is usually depicted as a hawk-headed man wearing the Double Crown and a breastplate over His kilt. Heru-sa-Aset's rise to kingship, embodied in a series of popular tales which are referred to in English as "the Contendings of Heru and Set," probably echoes the process of Kemet's unification undertaken by the early Upper Kemetic Predynastic chiefs, who considered themselves "Shemsu Heru" or "Followers of Horus."

Heru-sema-tawy - "Heru, Uniter of the Two Lands" A specialized Name of Heru as reuniter of the two kingdoms of Upper and Lower Kemet after the "Contendings of Heru and Set," possibly originally attributed to the ruler who first unified the two kingdoms and began the Dynastic Period of Kemetic history, and later becoming an epithet of the Name of Netjer.

Her-wer (Har-wer; G/R Haroeris) - "Great Heru/Heru the Elder" Heru in His most abstract, "original" form is known as a hawk, primarily a divinity of sky, even on Predynastic pottery and other objects. The hawk of Her-wer came to be associated with the kingship and was depicted seated atop the ruler's name in the original "serekh" (palace facade) style of hieroglyphic rendering. Her-wer is viewed as a brother, rather than son, of Wesir; His main opposite being Set, the Lord of the Red Land, and the storms in Her-wer's placid blue sky. Confusion of Her-wer's attributes with Heru-sa-Aset's led in later times to both Netjeru being intertwined; however, in His earliest depictions, Her-wer is strictly a celestial and sometimes solar divinity; only later is He associated with the kings and with the myth cycle of the Wesirian cult.

Hethert (Het-heret, Het-Heru; G/R Hathor) - "House of Heru" Another Name known from predynastic times, Hethert represents the feminine principle, as reflected in several of Her symbols: the cow, the mirror, and the ritual rattle or sistrum. Hethert is patroness of women, and professions given to Her priesthood include dancers, singers, actors and acrobats; even up to Greek times the arts were under Hethert's dominion. Hethert's temples, especially that at Ta-Netjer (Arabic Dendera) were centers for both healing (with a hospital/sanatorium on-site) and midwifery. Priests in the temple of Ta-Netjer conducted oracles with Hethert in trance rituals held in crypts underneath the sanctuary, and any person could sleep on the temple roof and hope for a dream, which could be interpreted the next morning by the priests. Even today, one can see graffiti and gameboards left behind by those pilgrims, carved into the stones of Ta-Netjer's roof. Hethert's association with both cows and the sistrum probably results from Her assimilation of the Predynastic Netjer Bat; "sistrum capitals" atop the pillars throughout Kemetic temples show Hethert's full face with cow's ears atop a "naos"-style sistrum. Hethert was closely associated with Heru-Behdety at Edfu, perhaps influencing the fact that She was a patroness of Kemet's queens (as Heru is to the king, so Hethert is to the queen). Some queens are referred to by Hethert's titles of "Mistress of Heaven" and "Lady of Gold." Nefertary's spectacular temple at Abu Simbel in Nubia depicts the Great Royal Wife as Hethert in many places; and her husband Ramses II is depicted in its sanctuary, suckling from the udder of Hethert as a divine cow.

Note: Due to the complex nature of the gods so gods have multiple meanings or other gods are connected to them in such a way that they are included. I'm stating this so that no one thinks that I repeated myself.
A Quiet thought---
You have opened a Portal.
You are cramming info. into your site at a fabulous rate.
This is GOOD!
However; Might i suggest, taking it easier on yourself;
All that is, was meant to be...
Take a break; visit our forum,
a private message would help;
Happy flying!
Love under Will;
Actually: do what thou will! It's marvellous to see!
AL: Dzyu etc...
I'm going to put down a couple and then it's off to do something for mother.

(I)

Imhotep (G/R Imouthis) - "In peace" Imhotep is one example of the "personality cult" of Kemet, whereby a learned sage or otherwise especially venerated person could be deified after death and become a special intercessor for the living, much as the saints of Roman Catholicism and forms of Orthodox Christianity. Imhotep the man is recorded as having lived during the Third Dynasty of the Old Kingdom. He is said to have been a chief lector-priest (kher-heb/hery-hebt hery-tep) as well as a famed architect and physician. The Step Pyramid complex of King Djoser at modern-day Saqqara is just one monument attributed to Imhotep's design. In the Late Period, Imhotep was identified with the Greek demigod Asklaepios and attributed with feats of miraculous healing. During this period, Imhotep was declared the son of Ptah and Sekhmet in the Triad of Mennefer (Memphis), and was sometimes identified with Their son, Nefertem.

Imset(y) (Amset; WB Meshtha) "The Kindly One" One of the "Four Sons of Heru" depicted in funerary literature as protecting the throne of Wesir in the Underworld, Imset is depicted as a mummified human wearing the "nemes" headcloth on funerary furniture and especially the "canopic" jars which held the organs of the deceased (Imset's jar held the liver). Later Hermetic philosophers would equate Imset with the element of water because of his association with the funerary protectress Aset and the direction of west.

Isis, another name for Aset.

Note: I'll post more sometime this week.
No problem. I'm really enjoying giving it out.
I'm back, to give info

(K)

Khenty-Amenti(u) - "Foremost of Westerners" Originally a title given to Yinepu as the primeval lord of the necropolis. Khenty-Amenti eventually became an epithet of Wesir as the Lord Judge of the Blessed Dead (the "westerners").

Khepera (Khepri; Khoprer; G/R Xepera) - "Becoming" As a theophany of the solar-god, the scarab beetle (Scarabeus sacer) is large, golden, and winged. It rolls balls of dung, sometimes for long distances, in order to have a place in which to lay its eggs. The young beetles then spring forth from the ball of dung, seemingly as if created from nothing. In this process, the ancients saw a metaphor for the daily progress of the sun (rolling as a ball across the sky every day), and for the mystery of creation and birth. Khepera as a full scarab or a scarab-headed man is often shown either within the Disk of the physical sun, or rolling it, as it were, from the eastern mountains in the morning and back into Tem's watchful embrace in the evening. Khepera is associated with the life-giving powers of sunlight and with the act of sunrise itself, forming a special triad with Ra (noontime sun) and Tem (setting sun).

Khnum - "Protector/Enricher" Depicted as a ram-headed man, Khnum is the form of the Self-Created One most venerated in Upper Kemet (as opposed to the Ra/Tem family of Mennefer and the Delta). Khnum is a potter, who molds the souls and bodies of all living things from the clay of the earth, and gives them the breath of life. His island at Abu (modern-day Elephantine, near Aswan) was said to be "the Seat of the First Time" - the place of creation - and kings would make pilgrimages to Khnum's temple to secure the inundation (and with it, the life of the lands) for another year. Khnum is given two consorts (or alternately, one consort and a daughter): Satet and Anuket. The situation of this island perhaps lent to Khnum's ability to predict or secure a viable inundation, as witnessed by ancient texts which tell of invocations to Khnum to "make Hapy smile on the land."

Khonsu (Chons) - "Traveller" Originally simply identified as the son of Amen and Mut of Uaset (Thebes), Khonsu is depicted as a youth standing on a plinth and mummified (very like Ptah), and having the princely side-lock, a beard, and a crescent moon headdress. Khonsu is especially associated with the moon (hence possibly the origins of His name), as His father Amen is with the sun. In later times, Khonsu became identified closely with Heru-sa-Aset and Heru-pa-khered as the "divine son" of the "King of Netjeru." In the 19th Dynasty, Ramses II sent a statue of Khonsu with great fame for miraculous healing powers to the kingdom of the Bactrians (Bekhten in Kemetic) to heal the Bekhteny king's daughter of a supposed demon possession - the story of this healing and the statue's part in it can be read in anthologies of ancient texts.

I'll post more in a couple of days.
(M)

Maahes (G/R Mihos) - "True Before Her(?)" A fairly obscure Name of Netjer depicted as a lion-headed man and worshipped especially in Upper Kemet and into Nubia (perhaps through confusion with the Nubian lion-god Apedemak) in later times, Maahes is often said to be the son of Bast and Ptah, and is sometimes considered another son of the Triad of Mennefer (beside Nefertem and sometimes Imhotep). He is depicted carrying a large knife and is invoked to protect the innocent and to punish transgressors of Ma'at.

Ma'at (G/R Mayet) - "Truth" Both the concept and the Name of Netjer associated with truth, justice, order, and "that which is right." Kemetic society hinged completely upon the furtherance of Ma'at, Who was considered to be the first emanation of Tem/Ra, and depicted as a woman with wings or alternately a woman with Her symbol, a single white ostrich feather, bound to Her head. Ma'at in antiquity was patroness of judges, magistrates and all court officials; the phrase "priest of Ma'at" in inscriptions can be understood as a euphemism for "judge." Ma'at's feather symbol is weighed against the heart of the deceased in the Hall of Judgment after death, a place which is also known as the Hall of Ma'ati, or Double Truth ("double" in Kemetic implying something more serious or intense than a "single" something, much as we use the terms "extra" or "advanced" or in the English language).

Mertseger - "She Who Loves Silence" - the Name of Netjer said to inhabit the peak of the highest mountain behind the Great Place at Uaset, (today known as Biban el-Muluk, or the Valley of the Kings, at Luxor). The peak itself is strikingly pyramid-shaped, and perhaps reminded the New Kingdom rulers of the great monuments Old Kingdom rulers had erected north at Giza and other locations. Mertseger was considered either to be a full lioness or a lion-headed woman (like Sekhmet and forms of Mut and Het-hert). Hymns honoring the "lion of the Peak," warning men to "Beware the Peak of the West!", along with prayers and appeals for Mertseger's mercy, have been found in the workmen's village at Deir-el-Medina, in the shadow of the Peak.

Meshkhenet - "Birthing-Place" A Name of Netjer associated, along with Heqet, with the midwifery and birth process, Meshkhenet's face was inscribed on the bricks or stools pregnant Kemetic women squatted upon while giving birth. In antiquity, Meshkhenet was considered to be something like the "fairy godmother" of European traditions, declaring the destiny of a child upon its birth and assisting in the blessing processes required to ensure the child would grow to be a healthy adult. Infant mortality in Kemet, as in many societies at the time, was a grave concern and so Meshkhenet's role at the birthing was considered crucial to the furtherance of Ma'at and life. Meshkhenet's role is sometimes equated or intertwined with that of both Heqet (the Midwife of Netjer) and Renenet (the Lady of the Year).

Min (Menu, Amsu) - "The Firm One" Originally probably a fertility-Name worshipped at Qubt (GR Coptos), even in Predynastic times, Min became associated with nearby Amen of Uaset and eventually an alternate depiction of the King of the Netjeru in all manner of temples and monuments. Min's image caused consternation both among the early Coptic Christians (who routinely defaced His monuments in temples they co-opted) and Victorian Egyptologists, who would take waist-up photographs of Min, or otherwise find ways to cover His protruding manhood (Min is always depicted ithyphallic, or with erect and uncovered phallus). Min's cult celebrated the fertility of the land with special festivals. The long-leaf lettuce which was Min's favorite food was also (probably not coincidentally) considered a powerful aphrodisiac. As this same lettuce is in later mythological cycles said to be the favorite food of Set, there may be a connection between the two Names as yet undiscovered.

Montu (Month, Mentu; G/R Monthis) - "Nomad" Montu, like Min, is another early Name which was assimilated into the cult of Amen at Uaset. Montu is originally depicted as either a bull, a hawk, or a hawk-headed man and is patron of all manner of martial arts and warfare, strength and masculine virility. The Greeks considered Montu a form of Ares, their war-god. Montu's prowess at leading armies and war parties caused his invocation before battles, and Kemet's greatest general-kings would call themselves "mighty bulls," the sons of Montu. Montu eventually would become nearly enfolded within the syncretic concept of Amen-Ra and that composite figure would absorb most of Montu's fighting nature, becoming the patron Netjer of the warrior-Pharaohs of the New Kingdom Empire.

Mut - "Mother" Wife of Amen of Uaset, Mut is depicted as a woman wearing the Double-Crown of Kemet's rulers. She was also sometimes given the head of a lioness and associated with both Sekhmet and Mertseger. At Karnak, Mut's great temple (now known as the Temple of Luxor, but in antiquity called Ipet-isut, or "the southern harem,") housed the great statues and sacred processional boat which went out once per year to make the trek up the canal to the Great Temple of Amen at Karnak, and would also receive Amen's statue and boat once per year during the Opet festival, celebrated to coincide with the Kemetic New Year. Mut's name can also mean "death" or "vulture," and so She was also given some of the attributes of Mertseger (the lion/vulture Netjer of the Valley of the Kings) and of Nekhbet (the vulture-Netjer protectress of Upper Kemet, of which Uaset was the capital). Beyond Her associations with Amen, Mut is not a very well-known Name but often is given similar attributes to Het-hert as patroness of women (especially mothers, as Her name implies), or of Sekhmet as a protectress of the innocent and a righter of wrongs.

Note: I'll post more in a couple of days.

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