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Here where I live, it can get extremely hot and humid during the day. The older I get, the less of the heat I can stand. So, I've begun to go sit on my porch after the sun goes down. But, that don't mean that I can't enjoy container gardening that not only looks good but smells heavenly and blooms in the evenings so I can enjoy them after sundown.

Out in my yard I have planted just your everyday average plants. They love full sun and look nice but I get tired of enjoying them out the window. I planted some night blooming plants that release their wonderful scents after dark! And since my porch faces the North, it gets very little sun except a tiny bit on one end in the early morning. Here is a list of some plants that smell great and look wonderful in containers or planted directly in the soil. This is just a sample and you can mix perennials as well as annuals together.  I have mixed in some impatients  with my evening container gardens also because they love shade and they don't close their blooms at night. They give me lots of beautiful color but has no smell.

Four O’Clocks (Mirabilis jalapa). These small blooms open in the late afternoon, as you might guess from their name. They come in a variety of hues, but I’m very fond of the “broken” colors, which mix several colors into one bloom.

Moonflower (Ipomoea alba). Moonflower, also called moonflower vine and moon vine, has large fragrant white flowers.

Evening Primrose (Oenothera spp). This is one of the more famous evening bloomers. They are yellow in color and the hummingbird moths will flock to the blooms.

Devil’s Trumpet (Datura) and Angel’s Trumpet (Brugmansia). These blooms both open in the evening, releasing the strong fragrance that attracts the large hawkmoths that pollinate them.  In general, these plants can be distinguished by the fact that datura blooms face upward, while brugmansia blooms hang down. Both are large, and come in single and double blooms. The Angel's Trumpets come in several colors but I have only seen the Devil's Trumpet bloom in white (Please note that both plants are very toxic – do not plant where children or pets could accidentally ingest.)

Night-Blooming Cereus (Selenicereus).  These blooms last only for a day, but release amazing scents while they’re open. Some species flower only seasonally (and one of them only one night a year!), but plenty of cereus species flower all year long. This is one of several night-blooming plants pollinated in part by nectar-eating bats. Cereus are white blooming plants. The species of Cereus that I have only blooms during a full moon in September. I've had the plant for several years and it always blooms then. If you don't wish to keep the plant indoors during the winter (they make a big plant), then you could let it live until the first frost, then dispose of it.

Flowering Tobacco (Nicotiana alata). This relative of tobacco is a prolific bloomer. The blooms are open all day, but their fragrance is not released until evening after the sun is down. I love sitting beside them and inhaling their lovely evening scent. They bloom in several colors.

Casa Blanca Lily (Lilium ’Casa Blanca’). This member of the Oriental Lily family is noted for being easy to grow, and producing large white flowers that emit an almost overpowering fragrance at night.

Don't let the words that bats visit the blooms at night scare you, the only bats that would be interested would be nectar eating bats not the bug eating variety that you normally see flying around in the evening. You will however, see the large moths paying the blooms a visit. And they are totally harmless but fascinating to watch.

So, give evening gardening a try! Ya'll pull up a chair and have a seat now, ya hear?

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Blessings,

Skye

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