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The Jesus Dilemma ~ What do you say to them?

First, I want to start off by saying that I respect ALL religions.  I want to start off by saying that there is no one true right path.  I want to start off by saying that each individual has the right to choose their spiritual path and the beliefs that they adhere to, and they deserve this right to be respected by the world community without coercion, ridicule, or prejudice.

I have nothing against Christianity or Jesus.  I have dear family members who follow this spiritual path as well as individuals close to our family circle, and I would not think of interfering with their decision, or degrading their practices, beliefs, and dogmas.  Among my own immediate family circle, we are a wide and diverse group.  My seven children include, not only Christian practitioners, but Buddhists, agnostics, Wiccans, atheists, and more.  Apparently this is something that makes us unique as a group of people that are close knit in spite of our varied and often conflicting spiritual beliefs.

It’s all good.

The ONLY thing that I find offensive about Christianity and the Jesus cult is the hard-core Christians who have a very obnoxious attitude of “My way or the highway”; their incessant domineering insistence that you must believe what they believe; and their often disrespectful attitude and response to people of other spiritual paths.  Sometimes this is very over-bearing and “in your face”, and other times it’s very subtle with biting quips and off hand remarks.

How should non-Christians respond when confronted by disrespect regarding our spiritual paths, practices, and deities without being disrespectful to someone elses’ spirituality?

It’s a conundrum.

A brief note to Christians determined to convert the non-Chrisitian ~

1.  Just as grounded and passionate as you are about your Christian faith, we are just as grounded and passionate about our faith.

2.  “But the Bible says…” — You are assuming that everyone in the world views the Bible as a divine work from the spirit world.  Not so.  I can’t speak for other non-Christians, but I view the Bible as a piece of literature written by men, from a male perspective, over the course of centuries, and modified much through various translations since then.  (Although the original was bad enough.)  There is nothing divine about it to me.  As a matter of fact, as a woman I find it very insulting and reflective of the negative attitudes towards women that prevailed back in the day, and even survives to some degree in modern times.

What the Bible says does not impress me.

3.  “You need God in your life…” — I’m assuming as in “god” you are referring to a super-natural entity of a high vibration.  If this is the case, I call this entity “Goddess”, and She indeed enriches my life and life experiences through my connection with Her and the daily spiritual practices I use to connect with Her energy.  I can only speak for myself when I say that I view divinity as a universal consciousness expressed around the world through a variety of pantheons, spiritual practices, mystical stories, and archetypes.  However you personally connect with “Divinity”, it will be a unique and blessed experience.  Just because your experience is different from my experience, it does not invalidate my experience, or the higher vibrational entity that I connect with on my spiritual journey.

4.  “I’ll pray for you…” — Under certain circumstances, this can be a positive statement to hear.  For instance, you’re facing a problem or a decision and close friends or family who are of the Christian faith want good things to happen for you.  It’s like saying, I’m on your side, or I’ll add my energy for a positive outcome, or I’m concerned about you and I want to help.  But when this comes from the lips of someone who is trying to convert you, someone who has pestered and preached to you about your spirituality, someone who has been at you to try and convince you are wrong in your beliefs… Then this statement can be chilling.

All thoughts are energy, no matter who they come from or what they consist of.  The energy that these people will be sending out into the universe will be very negative and conflicting with your soul and your connection to divinity.  Personally, I view this as the ultimate insult.

I like to respond without being negative or rude if at all possible.  I usually say, “Well, while you’re praying for me, I’ll be casting a spell for you.”  This generally brings about a very shocked reaction.  Maybe they never considered that you would reciprocate in kind, or that this was even an option.

5.  “It’s heaven or hell…” —  Actually, this is inaccurate.  The non-Christian has so many other options.  First, I have to say that the idea of “hell” came from the Bible, the book that was written by controlling domineering males who wanted to intimate and frighten people, which would make it so much easier to control people.  So we can just let hell go all together.

Other spiritualities have a variety of beliefs in what happens to us after death.  I can only speak for myself.  The following perceptions were typed out randomly, as they came to mind, in no specific order:

I believe in life after death; I also believe in reincarnation.  I believe that it’s possible for some very enlightened gifted individuals to connect with the spirits of those who have passed and communicate with them.  I believe in the Wiccan idea of  “The Summerland”.  I believe that certain soul connections are so strong and indomitable that they reconnect through many life times.  I believe that the soul is set free of the physical body at death.  I believe we have spirit guides to help us through major transitions in life, which includes death.

Views: 93

Comment by Who? on May 6, 2018 at 3:19am

Comment by Midrash on May 6, 2018 at 3:40am

Comment by Midrash on May 6, 2018 at 4:25am

That's how christians look like:

Comment by Meridian - The Idaean on May 6, 2018 at 8:35am

There's nothing you can say to them, no matter what you say.

It’s very commendable of you to want to engage Christianity with an interfaith approach, but you will always be considered the well intentioned fool, who collects for charity, cares for the environment, and is a decent upstanding human being, but at the same time they have a book that tells them exactly this.

  • Deuteronomy 18:10 "There shall not be found among you anyone who makes his son or his daughter pass through the fire, one who uses divination, one who practices witchcraft, or one who interprets omens, or a sorcerer. You shall not allow a witch to live.
  • Galatians 19 ‘the acts of the flesh are obvious: sexual immorality, impurity and debauchery; 20 idolatry and witchcraft; hatred, discord, jealousy, fits of rage, selfish ambition, dissensions, factions 21 and envy; drunkenness, orgies, and the like. I warn you, as I did before, that those who live like this will not inherit the kingdom of God.

22 But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, forbearance, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, 23 gentleness and self-control. Against such things there is no law. 24 Those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires. 25 Since we live by the Spirit, let us keep in step with the Spirit.

The upshot being is your going to hell. I don’t see how you can converse with people who believe in these things absolutely. To them you need saving, that's all.

Comment by Marion Jenis on May 10, 2018 at 8:57pm

A discussion about Jesus' journey to India after his bar mitzvah (when he was lost in the temple) will catch many Christians off guard, and will allow you to introduce the idea of reincarnation as an original Christian belief. This Gospel text supports the theory of reincarnation: "His disciples asked him, 'Rabbi, who sinned, this man or his parents, that he was born blind?' Jesus replied: 'Neither this man nor his parents sinned,' said Jesus, 'but this happened so that the works of God might be displayed in him.'" The mere possibility that the man sinned before his present birth requires us to believe that he was reincarnated.

Scriptures have been found in Buddhist monasteries in the southern Himalayan Mountains that talk about Sant Issa in a way that allows us to reasonably suppose that he was Jesus. Jesus' spiritual concept of the Messiah could owe its inspiration to the Buddhist ideal of the Bodhisattva or world savior. India was primarily Buddhist at that time, but Tibet had not yet been converted to Buddhism. It helps to know the history accurately. The "Aquarian Gospel of Jesus Christ" makes several mistakes---for example, when it supposes that Sant Issa went to Tibet. See the books by Nicholas Roerich, who explored the Silk Road.

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